College for All? Then Create Better Pathways for Low-Income Adults

This month, more than three million college students across the nation will heave a sigh of relief and celebrate having gotten to graduation day. They know their chances of getting a job and earning at least a middle-class living are much better with a college credential than without one, as recent Bureau of Labor Statistics data show.

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Data without Design: Don’t Do It!

In a recent blog post, Jacob Klerman and I argued that having administrative data available for answering a question about the impact of a program or intervention won't be successful unless paired with a good research design. Here is an all-too-typical example of why relying on administrative data, even where it includes the primary outcome of interest, is insufficient when a participant's entry into a program cannot be explained.  Since my purpose is general and not about the particular study, I’ve anonymized its description.

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How Zika Presents a Teachable Moment for Caring for Children with Disabilities

The Zika virus epidemic, first observed in Brazil in Spring of 2015, has spread to 43 countries and territories in the Americas. Although Zika has relatively mild clinical symptoms in adults and children, the disease has been linked to neurological disorders such as Guillain-Barre syndrome. Zika also has been connected to thousands of cases of microcephaly in infants throughout the Americas.

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Local Governments Lead the Way on Affordable Housing, Minimum Wage Reform

Across a range of social policy issues, cities and counties are becoming more active in developing local policy responses tailored to the needs of their residents. Building on an analogy to local policymaking on the minimum wage, my latest column focuses on the important role of high-cost cities and counties in developing comprehensive local housing strategies to increase the overall supply of housing and ensure the availability of housing affordable to people at all income levels. 

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The Next Malaria Threat: Insecticide Resistance and Strategies for Adapting

Insecticides have saved many lives from malaria, but we need to use them strategically to continue the momentum.

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Public and Private Pathways Toward Universal Health Coverage

In a blog post for the Joint Learning Network for Universal Health Coverage, we explain how public and private entities can work together to reach universal health coverage.

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The Long Reach of Inclusive Education

Across the globe, many students with disabilities face challenges in accessing high-quality education. Longstanding misconceptions exist regarding the capabilities of children with intellectual, physical, sensory, and learning disabilities to benefit from formal education. These misunderstandings have, for generations, driven educators to deny these students access to formal schooling.

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Categories: Education

Wanted: A Dose of Prevention in the ACA

Five years in, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has improved the delivery of health care in the United States. In my latest piece for the Huffington Post, I argue that more could be done, especially in preventing disease and promoting wellness, if we are to have a healthier nation in the next generation.

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Categories: U.S. Health

Fighting Data Poverty: How Simple Technologies Can Make Research on Marginalized Communities Easier for Everyone

As researchers dedicated to the public good, part of our mandate is to ensure that marginalized communities receive the research attention they need and deserve.

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How Can We Engage the Private Sector to Reach Family Planning Goals in Nigeria?

At this time when the world is working together to achieve the FP 2020 goal of increasing the number of women of childbearing age on family planning methods by 2020 - there is need for a radical change in Nigeria. In addition to supporting Family Planning 2020, Nigeria has set its own target of securing a 36% contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) by 2018.

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Categories: Family Planning