When it Comes to Publicly Funded Preschool, Are We Asking the Wrong Questions and Getting the Wrong Answers?

As enrollment in publicly funded preschool grows, many policymakers are asking, "Does publicly funded preschool work?" Unfortunately, determining whether publicly funded preschool "works" is harder than it sounds.

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Categories: Education

Are the “Principles of Digital Development” Agile?

Recently, Abt Associates endorsed the "Principles of Digital Development." These nine principles have been widely adopted by international development funders and practitioners to absorb and disseminate technology best practices in the field of international development. More than 50 organizations ranging from various offices in the United Nations and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) down to niche technology providers have endorsed the principles.

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The History of Unrecognized “AIDS” in Monkeys 1969-1980: What Can We Learn for Future Outbreaks of Infectious Diseases?

AIDS was recognized in humans in 1981 and simian AIDS was described in 1983-1985. However, researchers anecdotally reported seeing cases of opportunistic infections of AIDS in monkeys much earlier.

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A New Paradigm for Innovation in the Development Ecosystem

During a recent talk at Devex World, I posed this question: "How do we learn from the world of business, the rapidly changing world of start-ups and the sharing economy to change the way we do development?"

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What a New Study Tells Us about Homebuyer Education and Counseling

For generations, homeownership has been a gateway to the middle class and a cornerstone of the American Dream. Homeownership is one of the primary pathways to building wealth and financial security for U.S. families. However, as the recent collapse and uneven recovery of the housing market revealed, homeownership poses risks, both to borrowers and to the broader economy. Homebuyer education and counseling are intended to help individuals navigate the complexities of the housing market, make good home purchase and mortgage decisions, improve their financial management skills, and achieve sustainable homeownership and enhanced financial health. Despite the potential for homebuyer education and counseling, a lack of evidence exists on the question of its effectiveness.

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How Can We Measure and Evaluate the Racial Wealth Gap?

The current political cycle has prompted renewed interest in the nation's distribution of wealth - highlighting a disparity that is often called the nation's "wealth gap." The gap has been described as a chasm between the riches of the few set against the struggles of the poor and middle class. Yet a deeper social disparity has challenged public policy since the Civil Rights movement: even today, the fortunes of people of color remain radically different from those of white people.

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Creating an Interface between Health Authorities and Central Budget Agencies: Implications for Domestic Resource Mobilization for Health

When external health funding dwindles as government revenue grows in recipient countries, a natural reaction is to clamor for increased domestic financing for health.

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College for All? Then Create Better Pathways for Low-Income Adults

This month, more than three million college students across the nation will heave a sigh of relief and celebrate having gotten to graduation day. They know their chances of getting a job and earning at least a middle-class living are much better with a college credential than without one, as recent Bureau of Labor Statistics data show.

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Data without Design: Don’t Do It!

In a recent blog post, Jacob Klerman and I argued that having administrative data available for answering a question about the impact of a program or intervention won't be successful unless paired with a good research design. Here is an all-too-typical example of why relying on administrative data, even where it includes the primary outcome of interest, is insufficient when a participant's entry into a program cannot be explained.  Since my purpose is general and not about the particular study, I’ve anonymized its description.

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How Zika Presents a Teachable Moment for Caring for Children with Disabilities

The Zika virus epidemic, first observed in Brazil in Spring of 2015, has spread to 43 countries and territories in the Americas. Although Zika has relatively mild clinical symptoms in adults and children, the disease has been linked to neurological disorders such as Guillain-Barre syndrome. Zika also has been connected to thousands of cases of microcephaly in infants throughout the Americas.

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